Thursday, November 20, 2008

Equine euthanasia

With the recent economic challenges, more and more horse owners are finding themselves unable to properly care for their horses and feel their choices are to either send the horse to auction or euthanize. Euthanasia can cost upwards of $500 for the vet and removal, and so the owners turn to auctions as the only affordable option.

A horse rescue out west came up with a humane, creative solution. They are offering a free euthanasia clinic for unadoptable horses.

While this may seem like a controversial or extreme option to many readers, the alternative may be horses left to starve, suffer, or packed onto trucks to be slaughtered in Mexico or Canada.

Perhaps this new option will catch on in other states...

Here are some links on the topic:
http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=12990
http://www.news10.net/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=50783&provider=top

Peace,
Carrie
www.carrieeastman.com

Copyright ©2016 Carrie Eastman.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration or American Veterinary Medical Association, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your veterinarian about any changes to your animal’s health program.

Really funny Fainting Goat Video !

Click on this for a great video set to music.

No training posts today. Still busy with winter barn projects. So far I finished another wall on the new barn and added a corral fence. Today I'm setting posts and adding gates to the goat pens. Busy, busy, busy....but very fun.

Lucky of course is checking out each project - all the tools and materials get a thorough sniffing and maybe a taste. Even stuck his nose in the post hole to smell what might be in there. Silly Arabian! It's a good thing Ben is more concerned with eating, as he has a reputation for picking up and taking or throwing tools, jackets, shoes, pitchforks...

Until next post, be well and stay warm!

Carrie
www.carrieeastman.com

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Video - Dressage vs. Western equestrians

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrYOQ52U3LQ

The Western rider is Dennis Schulz, the Dressage rider is Peter Gmoser, both from Austria.

Carrie
www.carrieeastman.com

PS - no Lucky posts this past week as I've been busy finishing up the winter building projects. Hope to have more to share by the end of this week.

Thursday, November 6, 2008

Poco, Ben and Snowflake - my aged horses

I have 3 senior equines at home. Snowflake (pony-pony) is a mini of about 25 years. Poco is a chestnut QH/Appaloosa cross (maybe) and is at least 25. Ben is a 22 year old gray Arabian, turning 23 this year. I've had Poco since he was 6, and he has been an amazing teacher for me. We've tried all sorts of training techniques, done some dressage, a bit of jumping, walked through his healing from navicular, ringbone and sidebone and more. For those of you who follow holistic animal care, Poco's prepurchase exam and years later his first homeopathic care both came from Dr. Edgar Sheaffer at Clark Veterinary Clinic http://clarkvetclinic.com/ Poco is also the horse that got me back on the path of holistic health, after giving me a wonderful case of whiplash which led me to a very special chiropractor, who in turn led me to Dynamite and Dr. Regan Golob. Funny how life works!








Ben I've had since he was 12, and before that he was a racehorse, then a hack horse for hire, then he belonged to my best friend for years doing trail rides and a bit of hunt seat.



These days we trail ride together to stay in shape. Ben is in training to do competitive trail, as he really doesn't care for playing in the ring at all. Poco on the other hand prefers the ring to the trails, and is the guy I go to when I want to ride bareback/bridleless, work on my own techniques, or give rides to the kids.





Ben and Poco have some trouble chewing these days. Ben has lost several teeth, while all of Poco's molars are worn to the gumline. Both do just fine on Dynamite Pelleted Grain Ration and timothy hay pellets, soaked to mush. In the winter I add a handful of Dynamite HES for extra fat to their ration. They get all the Dynamite free choice minerals, DynaPro prebiotic, Excel, a biannual cleanse with Dynamite Herbal Tonic and yucca. I also give them Waiora Natural Cellular Defense at least twice yearly for any heavy metals they may pick up, especially mercury. You can find these products at:
www.dynamiteonline.com/carrieeastman
www.mywaiora.com/992799



Snowflake just hangs out and flirts with the big boys. She gets the same program as the big boys, but only a smidge of the Pelleted Grain Ration and no hay pellets, as her teeth are still in great shape.
Finally, just for inspiration, here is an article about Elmer Bandit, a 37 year old horse that just set a new mileage record. http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=12972&nID=1&src=RA

Carrie
http://www.carrieeastman.com/

Copyright ©2016 Carrie Eastman.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration or American Veterinary Medical Association, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your veterinarian about any changes to your animal’s health program.

Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Lucky's progress






Well, you know what they say about the best laid plans...



Had 2 sessions planned for this week under saddle.



What we actually had was a session about "Yes, I really CAN catch you in the field". He saw me coming, flicked his tail, and took off at a gallop herding all the horses with him. So I spent some time sending him, until he decided to walk over and stand. Then I haltered him, petted him and turned him loose. Took one more round until he figured it out and decided not to walk away from me.



The next day we just did some TTouch bodywork and called it a day. Much to his suprise.
Tonight we did TTEAM bodywork and ground exercises. I had planned to ride, but the crisp fall weather had him really, really wound up so I decided to start with a bit of ground work. That little bit turned into a full session as we worked through some resistance and discovered what he could do really well. These shots are from that session. I alternated between TTEAM ground obstacles, some natural horsemanship work on yielding the front and hind and sidepassing along the fence, and TTEAM TTouch when he needed a break or was getting too wound up. He followed me at a jog through the TTEAM labyrinth, and I bet he would do it without any halter at all. Such a willing guy!



I can tell he is still making up his mind about our relationship, now that I am actually asking him to do things for me. I think he's going to become a great trail horse and friend.



It's all perfect.






Till next time,



Carrie & Lucky



www.carrieeastman.com

Copyright ©2016 Carrie Eastman.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration or American Veterinary Medical Association, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your veterinarian about any changes to your animal’s health program.

Monday, November 3, 2008

Lucky - week 1



Week 1 - Our first rides
Our goals for our first week are:
Standing still for mounting from both sides.
Lowering the head.
Work on our transitions between walk, halt, back and trot. Especially the halt...
Work on yielding the head, the shoulders and the hindquarters.
TTEAM and TTouch to address his stiffness to the right, especially behind. TTouch is also teaching him that people can be fun to connect with. The TTEAM exercises a great for keeping his active Arabian mind challenged and interested. You can learn more about TTEAM and TTouch at http://www.lindatellingtonjones.com/
We are working in enclosed areas first.
So far he is learning very quickly. The biggest challenge is changing activities often enough to keep his attention. He is very flexible in the neck and front end, but stiff behind, especially to the right. When he was just hanging out in the pasture, he was very friendly and curious. Now that I'm asking him to do things, he is a bit uncertain about our friendship. He is still curious, but is challenging me occasionally in subtle ways. I really enjoyed watching him respond to TTouch, and learning which TTouches he likes the best. He dropped his head and gave a huge sigh when I did python lifts on his hind legs and he really likes tail work. Mouth touches are his least favorite, followed by neck exercises.
Carrie & Lucky
www.carrieeastman.com

Copyright ©2016 Carrie Eastman.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration or American Veterinary Medical Association, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your veterinarian about any changes to your animal’s health program.

Lucky the Arabian horse - his story continued




Background and prep work:



Back in March I introduced Lucky, the youngest and latest addition to our equine family. Lucky's real name is To Catch A Thief. A registered Arabian, Lucky was bred to race. A few years ago he bowed a tendon on the track. After pasture rest, I purchased him to train for endurance and whatever other activity he wanted to try. (Notice the human-looking eye. This comes from his great-grandfather Wicking and is common in his bloodline)



My goal is to get Lucky under saddle and on the trail over the winter, to start competing in rides next spring. I thought readers might enjoy following Lucky on his journey.
This past week, I got Lucky's tack set up. While I normally work with rope halters or a simple snaffle bridle for starting young horses or retraining, Lucky comes from the racetrack and is capable of extreme speed and sudden starts at a gallop. For safety a trainer suggested I use a low-port slotted kimberwick for stopping power in a crisis. The chin strap is loose to minimize the pressure and most of the leverage is at the crown/poll.



I ride with a very loose noseband, just tight enough to prevent the bit ends from sliding into his mouth. I don't like tight nosebands because they prevent chewing, which clenches the jaw and affects the entire spine down to his hindquarters. I also want to be able to see if something I am doing is causing him to evade the bit by opening his mouth, and a tight noseband hides this. (The bridle you see him in now is temporary until the biothane bridle arrives. You can see in the top photo that the throatlatch is a bit too tight, and the noseband, which was a flash noseband, doesn't sit at the correct height. Lucky accepted both, so I am confident they are not making him uncomfortable for now)

I worked with Prudence Heaney at http://www.twotimetack.com/ to fit a saddle to Lucky. He has a lot of memories associated with tack, so my first couple rides I just slid on bareback. We'll be starting with the saddle this coming week.

I also touched up his trim, because hoof length is critical with old bowed tendons. There are some great links to trimming websites with good photos on my links page at http://www.carrieeastman.com/ I'm a particular fan of Pete Ramey's work.

Finally, I did a nose to tail body assessment to check his nutritional program and structure before getting started. There is more information about the bodywork and nutrition on my website on the horse page.
Copyright ©2016 Carrie Eastman.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration or American Veterinary Medical Association, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your veterinarian about any changes to your animal’s health program.